Eye Conditions and Treatments

Chalazion / Stye

Chalazion is a slowly developing lump that forms due to blockage and swelling of an oil gland in the eyelid. It is more common in adults than children and occurs most frequently in persons 30 to 50 years of age.

Initially, a chalazion may appear as a red, tender, swollen area of the eyelid. However, in a few days it turns into a painless, slow-growing lump. A chalazion often starts out very small and is barely noticeable, but may grow to the size of a pea. Oftentimes they may be confused with styes, which are also areas of swelling in the eyelid.

A stye is an infection of an oil gland in the eyelid. It produces a red, swollen, painful lump on the edge or inside surface of the eyelid. Styes usually occur closer to the surface of the eyelid than do chalazia. A chalazion is generally not due to an infection, but results from a blockage of the oil gland itself. However, a chalazion may occur as an after-effect of a stye. Learn More About Chalazion / Stye

Dry Eyes

Dry Eye Disease is often referred to as ocular surface disease, keratoconjunctivitis sicca or dry eye syndrome. It is often associated with blepharitis and meibomian gland disease (meibomianitis).

Dry eye is a condition in which there are insufficient tears to lubricate and nourish the eye. Tears are necessary for maintaining the health of the front surface of the eye and for providing clear vision. People with dry eyes either do not produce enough tears or have a poor quality of tears. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.Learn More About Dry Eyes

Floaters

Spots (often called floaters) are small, semi-transparent or cloudy specks or particles within the vitreous, which is the clear, jelly-like fluid that fills the inside of your eyes. They appear as specks of various shapes and sizes, threadlike strands or cobwebs. Because they are within your eyes, they move as your eyes move and seem to dart away when you try to look at them directly. Learn More About Floaters

Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a group of eye disorders leading to progressive damage to the optic nerve, and is characterized by loss of nerve tissue resulting in loss of vision. The optic nerve is a bundle of about one million individual nerve fibers and transmits the visual signals from the eye to the brain.

The most common form of glaucoma, primary open-angle glaucoma, is associated with an increase in the fluid pressure inside the eye. This increase in pressure may cause progressive damage to the optic nerve and loss of nerve fibers. Vision loss may result. Advanced glaucoma may even cause blindness. Not everyone with high eye pressure will develop glaucoma, and many people with normal eye pressure will develop glaucoma. When the pressure inside an eye is too high for that particular optic nerve, whatever that pressure measurement may be, glaucoma will develop. Learn More About Glaucoma

Macular Degeneration

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is damage or breakdown of the macula. The macula is a small area at the back of the eye that allows us to see fine detail clearly. When the macula doesn’t function correctly, we experience blurriness or darkness in the center of our vision. Age-related macular degeneration affects both distance and near vision, and can make some activities, like threading a needle or reading, very difficult or totally impossible.

When the macula is damaged it results in extreme loss of central vision. Since the peripheral retina is not involved in macular degeneration, it does not lead to complete blindness. Learn More About Macular Degeneration

Diabetic Retinopathy

Diabetic retinopathy is a condition occurring in persons with diabetes, which causes progressive damage to the retina, the light sensitive lining at the back of the eye. It is a serious sight-threatening complication of diabetes.

Diabetes is a disease that interferes with the body’s ability to use and store sugar, which can cause many health problems. Too much sugar in the blood can cause damage throughout the body, including the eyes. Over time, diabetes affects the circulatory system of the retina.

Diabetic retinopathy is the result of damage to the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina. They leak blood and other fluids that cause swelling of retinal tissue and clouding of vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the more likely they will develop diabetic retinopathy. If left untreated, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness. Learn More About Diabetic Retinopathy

Keratoconus

Keratoconus is a vision disorder that occurs when the normally round cornea (the front part of the eye) becomes thin and irregularly (cone) shaped. This abnormal shape prevents the light entering the eye from being focused correctly on the retina and causes distortion of vision. Learn More About Keratoconus

Cataracts

A cataract is a cloudy or opaque area in the normally clear lens of the eye. Depending upon its size and location, it can interfere with normal vision. Most cataracts develop in people over age 55, but they occasionally occur in infants and young children. Usually cataracts develop in both eyes, but one may be worse than the other. Researchers have linked eye-friendly nutrients such as lutein/zeaxanthin, vitamin C, vitamin E and zinc to reducing the risk of certain eye diseases, including cataracts.Learn More About Cataracts

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Woodruff, SC 29388
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